LET US CONTINUE TO MAKE GOOD MEMORIES
Suite 101, 1220 West Market Street
Wilmington, Delaware  U.S.A. 19901
Tel: 1-302-123-7777
RCSCC IRON DUKE ALUMNI 75TH 2018 REUNION - HISTORY
The building itself was constructed in 1858 as a Methodist Church and was used as a Sunday
school and the local Canadian Legion before it became IRON DUKE’s headquarters. On
November 11th, 1980, the building and attached boatshed were gutted by an electrical fire that
began in the building’s basement. The outer brick was all that remained after the flames we put
out by fire services. For the next 14 months the cadets and officers moved to numerous
temporary quarters until the building was finally re-opened for occupation in January 1982. In
September 1996 the missing portion of IRON DUKE was restored with the opening of the latest
addition the Gordon Powell Tender, known and the ‘Boatshed’.
The Corps most prize possession, an original Tampion from the Dreadnought HMS IRON DUKE.
Originally this fixture was one of the two wooden muzzle covers for the thirteen point five inch
guns that decorated and protected the upper-deck of HMS IRON DUKE. The other Tampion is
with our corps Patron: His Royal Highness, the Duke of Wellington. Fortunately, this namesake
memorabilia was not damaged in the fire and it still hangs proudly over the Brow of our ship. The
Silver Cup is IRON DUKE’s oldest trophy and is annually awarded to the Top Cadet of our corps.
Sadly the fire did destroy many models and memorabilia collected over the years. Surprisingly,
however, all of the old photographs and newspaper clippings that managed to survive became
the basis of a history book documenting the Corps activities since 1943. Articles currently on
display have been collected since 1980.
The Corp has been a mainstay in the community supporting its Veterans and training youth in
leadership, physical fitness and generating an interest in the Canadian Navy. The Corp has been
standing proud for over 72 years.
The building itself was constructed in 1858 as a Methodist Church and was used as a Sunday
school and the local Canadian Legion before it became IRON DUKE’s headquarters. On
November 11th, 1980, the building and attached boatshed were gutted by an electrical fire that
began in the building’s basement. The outer brick was all that remained after the flames we put
out by fire services. For the next 14 months the cadets and officers moved to numerous
temporary quarters until the building was finally re-opened for occupation in January 1982. In
September 1996 the missing portion of IRON DUKE was restored with the opening of the latest
addition the Gordon Powell Tender, known and the ‘Boatshed’.
The Corps most prize possession, an original Tampion from the Dreadnought HMS IRON DUKE.
Originally this fixture was one of the two wooden muzzle covers for the thirteen point five inch
guns that decorated and protected the upper-deck of HMS IRON DUKE. The other Tampion is
with our corps Patron: His Royal Highness, the Duke of Wellington. Fortunately, this namesake
memorabilia was not damaged in the fire and it still hangs proudly over the Brow of our ship. The
Silver Cup is IRON DUKE’s oldest trophy and is annually awarded to the Top Cadet of our corps.
Sadly the fire did destroy many models and memorabilia collected over the years. Surprisingly,
however, all of the old photographs and newspaper clippings that managed to survive became
the basis of a history book documenting the Corps activities since 1943. Articles currently on
display have been collected since 1980.
The Corp has been a mainstay in the community supporting its Veterans and training youth in
leadership, physical fitness and generating an interest in the Canadian Navy. The Corp has been
standing proud for over 72 years.
The Burlington, Ontario, Canada Branch of the Navy League of Canada was established
in October of 1942 and the first cadets joined and paraded in the months of February of
1943. The Sea Cadet Corps was named after Her Majesty’s Ship IRON DUKE, the
British Royal Navy Dreadnaught and fleet flagship in the First World War. The name
seemed the most appropriate as ‘Iron Duke’ was the nickname for the First Duke of
Wellington (of the Battle of Waterloo), and the downtown core of Burlington was once
called Wellington Square when the town of Burlington was first established. The initial
Warrant was issued to the Burlington Navy League Branch on the 6th of March 1943.
The Cadets first paraded in the John Gould residence at 52 Water Street, now the site
of Caldon Apartments on Lakeshore Road across from Spencer Smith Park. As the
Corps grew, it began parading at the East End Public School, now called Lakeshore
Public School from 1945 to 1949. In late 1949, the Navy League Branch acquired the
existing facilities at 451 Elizabeth Street as a permanent home for RCSCC IRON
DUKE.
The Burlington, Ontario, Canada Branch of the Navy League of Canada was established
in October of 1942 and the first cadets joined and paraded in the months of February of
1943. The Sea Cadet Corps was named after Her Majesty’s Ship IRON DUKE, the
British Royal Navy Dreadnaught and fleet flagship in the First World War. The name
seemed the most appropriate as ‘Iron Duke’ was the nickname for the First Duke of
Wellington (of the Battle of Waterloo), and the downtown core of Burlington was once
called Wellington Square when the town of Burlington was first established. The initial
Warrant was issued to the Burlington Navy League Branch on the 6th of March 1943.
The Cadets first paraded in the John Gould residence at 52 Water Street, now the site
of Caldon Apartments on Lakeshore Road across from Spencer Smith Park. As the
Corps grew, it began parading at the East End Public School, now called Lakeshore
Public School from 1945 to 1949. In late 1949, the Navy League Branch acquired the
existing facilities at 451 Elizabeth Street as a permanent home for RCSCC IRON
DUKE.
RCSCC IRON DUKE ALUMNI 75TH 2018 REUNION - HISTORY
The Burlington, Ontario, Canada Branch of the Navy League of Canada was established in
October of 1942 and the first cadets joined and paraded in the months of February of 1943.
The Sea Cadet Corps was named after Her Majesty’s Ship IRON DUKE, the British Royal
Navy Dreadnaught and fleet flagship in the First World War. The name seemed the most
appropriate as ‘Iron Duke’ was the nickname for the First Duke of Wellington (of the Battle of
Waterloo), and the downtown core of Burlington was once called Wellington Square when the
town of Burlington was first established. The initial Warrant was issued to the Burlington
Navy League Branch on the 6th of March 1943.
The Cadets first paraded in the John Gould residence at 52 Water Street, now the site of
Caldon Apartments on Lakeshore Road across from Spencer Smith Park. As the Corps
grew, it began parading at the East End Public School, now called Lakeshore Public School
from 1945 to 1949. In late 1949, the Navy League Branch acquired the existing facilities at 451
Elizabeth Street as a permanent home for RCSCC IRON DUKE.
The building itself was constructed in 1858 as a Methodist Church and was used as a Sunday
school and the local Canadian Legion before it became IRON DUKE’s headquarters. On
November 11th, 1980, the building and attached boatshed were gutted by an electrical fire that
began in the building’s basement. The outer brick was all that remained after the flames we
put out by fire services. For the next 14 months the cadets and officers moved to numerous
temporary quarters until the building was finally re-opened for occupation in January 1982. In
September 1996 the missing portion of IRON DUKE was restored with the opening of the
latest addition the Gordon Powell Tender, known and the ‘Boatshed’.
The Corps most prize possession, an original Tampion from the Dreadnought HMS IRON
DUKE. Originally this fixture was one of the two wooden muzzle covers for the thirteen point
five inch guns that decorated and protected the upper-deck of HMS IRON DUKE. The other
Tampion is with our corps Patron: His Royal Highness, the Duke of Wellington. Fortunately,
this namesake memorabilia was not damaged in the fire and it still hangs proudly over the
Brow of our ship. The Silver Cup is IRON DUKE’s oldest trophy and is annually awarded to
the Top Cadet of our corps. Sadly the fire did destroy many models and memorabilia
collected over the years. Surprisingly, however, all of the old photographs and newspaper
clippings that managed to survive became the basis of a history book documenting the Corps
activities since 1943. Articles currently on display have been collected since 1980.
The Corp has been a mainstay in the community supporting its Veterans and training youth in
leadership, physical fitness and generating an interest in the Canadian Navy. The Corp has
been standing proud for over 72 years.
The Burlington, Ontario, Canada Branch of the Navy
League of Canada was established in October of 1942
and the first cadets joined and paraded in the months
of February of 1943. The Sea Cadet Corps was named
after Her Majesty’s Ship IRON DUKE, the British
Royal Navy Dreadnaught and fleet flagship in the First
World War. The name seemed the most appropriate
as ‘Iron Duke’ was the nickname for the First Duke of
Wellington (of the Battle of Waterloo), and the
downtown core of Burlington was once called
Wellington Square when the town of Burlington was
first established. The initial Warrant was issued to the
Burlington Navy League Branch on the 6th of March
1943.
The Cadets first paraded in the John Gould residence
at 52 Water Street, now the site of Caldon Apartments
on Lakeshore Road across from Spencer Smith Park.
As the Corps grew, it began parading at the East End
Public School, now called Lakeshore Public School
from 1945 to 1949. In late 1949, the Navy League
Branch acquired the existing facilities at 451 Elizabeth
Street as a permanent home for RCSCC IRON DUKE.
The building itself was constructed in 1858 as a
Methodist Church and was used as a Sunday school
and the local Canadian Legion before it became IRON
DUKE’s headquarters. On November 11th, 1980, the
building and attached boatshed were gutted by an
electrical fire that began in the building’s basement.
The outer brick was all that remained after the flames
we put out by fire services. For the next 14 months the
cadets and officers moved to numerous temporary
quarters until the building was finally re-opened for
occupation in January 1982. In September 1996 the
missing portion of IRON DUKE was restored with the
opening of the latest addition the Gordon Powell
Tender, known and the ‘Boatshed’.
The Corps most prize possession, an original Tampion
from the Dreadnought HMS IRON DUKE. Originally
this fixture was one of the two wooden muzzle covers
for the thirteen point five inch guns that decorated and
protected the upper-deck of HMS IRON DUKE. The
other Tampion is with our corps Patron: His Royal
Highness, the Duke of Wellington. Fortunately, this
namesake memorabilia was not damaged in the fire
and it still hangs proudly over the Brow of our ship. The
Silver Cup is IRON DUKE’s oldest trophy and is
annually awarded to the Top Cadet of our corps. Sadly
the fire did destroy many models and memorabilia
collected over the years. Surprisingly, however, all of
the old photographs and newspaper clippings that
managed to survive became the basis of a history book
documenting the Corps activities since 1943. Articles
currently on display have been collected since 1980.
The Corp has been a mainstay in the community
supporting its Veterans and training youth in
leadership, physical fitness and generating an interest
in the Canadian Navy. The Corp has been standing
proud for over 72 years.
LET US CONTINUE TO MAKE GOOD MEMORIES